Art History

Art History

Welcome to the Art History section of CreativeSpotlite.com. On the following pages you will find an abundance of art history resources spanning thousands of years. You will find everything from Claude Monet to Prehistoric Art. Please enjoy and stop back often!

Art History Resources

  • REMBRANDT

    The French Impressionists

    By MORTIMER MENPES

    Although I am familiar with Rembrandt's work, through photographs and black and white reproductions, I invariably experience a shock from the colour standpoint whenever I come in touch with one of his pictures. I was especially struck with that masterpiece of his at the Hermitage, called the Slav Prince, which, by the way, I am convinced is a portrait of himself; any one who has had the idea suggested cannot doubt it for a moment; it is Rembrandt's own face without question.

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  • The Madonna in Art

    The French Impressionists

    By ESTELLE M. HURLL

    It is now about fifteen centuries since the Madonna with her Babe was first introduced into art, and it is safe to say that, throughout all this time, the subject has been unrivalled in popularity. It requires no very profound philosophy to discover the reason for this. The Madonna is the universal type of motherhood, a subject which, in its very nature, appeals to all classes and conditions of people. No one is too ignorant to understand it, and none too wise to be superior to its charm.

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  • The French Impressionists

    The French Impressionists

    By CAMILLE MAUCLAIR

    I do not profess to give here a detailed and complete history of Impressionism, for which several volumes like the present one would be required. I shall only try to compile an ensemble of concise and very precise notions and statements bearing upon this vast subject. It will be my special object to try and prove that Impressionism is neither an isolated manifestation, nor a violent denial of the French traditions, but nothing more or less than a logical return to the very spirit of these traditions, contrary to the theories upheld by its detractors...

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  • Caravaggio - The Torchbearer of Baroque Art

    By Annette Labedzki

    Italian artist, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio or Michelangelo Caravaggio, or simply Caravaggio was born on September 28, 1573, in Milan, to father, Fermo Merisi, and mother, Lucia Aratori. He became an orphan at the age of eleven. Soon he was apprenticed to the painter, Simone Peterzano for four years. This proved to be a blessing in disguise for Caravaggio. Peterzano was a poor painter who gave his students many opportunities to blossom on their own. This prompted Caravaggio to develop a style of painting that was unique to him. He excelled in Baroque Art, which was encouraged by the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • Sir William Russell Flint, a Master of Watercolour

    By David Tatham

    Producing a collection of watercolour paintings for approximately 70 years, Sir William Russell Flint is a legend amongst admirers of fine art. He was born in 1880 and died in 1969 after a long and distinguished artistic career. His mother was Jane Russell Flint - amongst the first of Scottish female civil servants and his father, Francis Wighton Flint, was a ticket writer and an illuminator. He also had 2 siblings - a brother and a sister. His remarkable talent was recognized early in age and he was enrolled into the Royal School of Art in Edinburgh, Scotland. On completion, he served a six-year apprenticeship with a large printing works in Edinburgh as lithographic artist and a designer.

     

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  • Light in Art - An Ever-Changing Phenomena

    By Lois Dewitt

    THE LIGHTLESS MEDIEVAL WORLD In the mid-eastern and medieval tradition, early paintings of Christ and His followers depicted these spiritual beings as icons occupying a very flat pictorial world. The figures were drawn with simple lines and colored with mainly earth-toned pigments. Light, emitted by halos, as well as spiritual auras, were expressed in intricate designs and patterns or gilded to represent light and spirituality.

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  • Georgia O'Keeffe - The Legend of Modern Abstract Art

    By Annette Labedzki

    Georgia O'Keeffe or Georgia Totto O'Keeffe was an American painter, who revolutionized the concept of modern abstract art. Born on November 15, 1887 in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, Georgia O'Keeffe grew up in Virginia. She graduated from the Chatham Protestant Episcopal Institute in Williamsburg, Virginia in 1904, and studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago (1905) and the Art Students League of New York (1907). She later moved to Texas and headed the Art Department at the West Texas State Normal College in 1916. The charm of the barren landscape caught O'Keeffe's fascination, tilting the balance of her artistic skills towards capturing the beauty of the valleys and plains that surrounded her.

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  • An Approach To French Art

    By Jakob Jelling

    France has been among the main pioneers in many artistic expression forms throughout the country's history. France and art are both strongly attached to each other and it would not be possible to think of world art without thinking of France or think or Frances main characteristics without thinking of art. French art has had a very important influence not only in the French culture but also in the rest of the world.

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  • Pablo Picasso and the Girl in the White Chemise - From Blue to Rose

    By Connor R Sullivan

    There is something about a portrait that captures the imagination. While a great photograph is powerful, a painting artist can create magic, interpreting mood and shaping the image. Many people have found that great anniversary gifts are portraits. Artists through the ages have loved doing portraits. Pablo Picasso painted many stunning portraits in many different styles. He painted many self portraits and plenty of paintings of models. His painting of Girl in Chemise is a moody study of a waif like girl.

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  • The life of Goya

    By Mike McDougall

    Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes was born in Fuendetodos in 1740, a town close to Saragossa in the North east of Spain. Shortly after his family moved to nearby Saragossa and this is where he spent the early years of his life. At the age of 14 he was apprenticed to José Luzanan, an artist and friend of his father. He later was to continue his studies of art in Italy before returning to Saragossa in 1771 where landed the job of painting frescoes in city's cathedral.

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  • Things You Should Know about Pop Art Paintings History

    By Ispas Marin

    Pop art was an artistic movement that represented a strong shift from the influence of the abstract expressionism. Pop art paintings brought an original form of making art by introducing techniques of commercial art and everyday life illustrations.

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  • Frida Kahlo

    By Mike McDougall

    Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderón was born in her parents' house in the small town of Coyoacán, on the outskirts of Mexico City, on July 6 1907. She was the daughter of a German-Jewish, painter and photographer father, who heralded from Romania. When she was six years old, Frida suffered from polio, which left her right leg much thinner than the left. It was here that her trademark feistiness and aggressive personality first showed, as she overcame her disability.

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  • The life of Joan Miró

    By Mike McDougall

    Joan Miró, the legendary Spanish painter, sculptor and ceramist, was born in Barcelona in 1893. Miró's early life was nothing out of the ordinary, at age 14 he enrolled in the "Escuela Superior de Artes Industriales y Bellas Artes" where he studied for three years. After this he took on a job as a clerk In Barcelona but after suffering a nervous breakdown Miró decided that this wasn't the career for him so he returned to his studies, this time at Francesc Gali's "Escuela d'Art" where he studied for a further 3 years up until 1915.

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  • Turner and "The Fighting Temeraire"

    By Agnes Conway

    I wonder which of you, if seeing this picture for the first time, will realize that you are looking at the old familiar Thames? It would seem rather to be some place unknown except in dreams, some phantasy of the human spirit that we ourselves could never hope to see. And yet, in fact, this is what Turner actually did see one evening as he was sailing down the Thames to Greenwich with a party of friends.

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  • Jean Francois Millet

    By Kenyon Cox

    Jean François Millet, who lived hard and died poor, is now perhaps the most famous artist of the nineteenth century. His slightest work is fought for by dealers and collectors, and his more important pictures, if they chance to change hands, bring colossal and almost incredible prices. And of all modern reputations his, so far as we can see, seems most likely to be enduring.

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  • Vincent Van Gogh - A Depth of Passion Transformed

    By John Keaton

    In the annals of art history, there is no comparison to the enduringly tragic and passionate life of Vincent Van Gogh. His works have been embraced and are treasured by a world which once scarcely understood or accepted this tragic and tortured genius. The beauty of his remarkably prolific career lies in the intensity and conviction of heart, which he placed in his images. His works remain etched and embossed within our subconscious and still linger in our minds long after this tormented soul’s dramatic departure from this life....

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